Sunday, March 29, 2009

Tacoma Dome



"...needs work, roof, carpet, paint, etc, deck is rotten..." So, other than the roof and the deck -- which leaves what, exactly, when you have a wall-free house? -- it's in great shape.

(I'm cheating a little, because I doubt it's possible to take a better photo of this house, but I'm so amused by the idea of a dome in Fife that I'm putting it up anyway.)

11 comments:

Emily said...

Personally, I'm more interested in why this oddball (in more ways than one) was purchased 2 weeks ago for over $153,000 and put back on the market 3 days ago for only $60,000. The true definition of a money pit!

Sara said...

That is interesting, Emily. I wonder what's going on there.

Stuart said...

Something really nasty may have been discovered: termites, black mold, Marv Albert's lingerie stash ... who knows?

Do those things have to be listed or merely disclosed to the potential vict- I mean buyers?

Anonymous said...

It's a haunting in Fife, I tell you!

Or a tax shelter.

Or someone's dream of living in half a golf ball gone sour, but I'm telling you, there's a story there!

A story of the world's worst financial adviser's adventures in real estate holdings. Start with something square, lad, start with something at least rectangular.

jackie31337 said...

I actually really like this odd little "dome home". For $60k, it would worth fixing it up, but Emily's comment does make me suspicious.

Rebecca said...

"Personally, I'm more interested in why this oddball (in more ways than one) was purchased 2 weeks ago for over $153,000 and put back on the market 3 days ago for only $60,000. The true definition of a money pit!"

Usually that means it's a bank-owned foreclosure. The higher amount is what the bank took it back for, then they turned around and dumped it on the market at a fire-sale price. We bought a foreclosed house like that.

Sara said...

Looks like you're right, Rebecca.

Being a nosy person I looked it up and, if I'm reading it correctly, it was sold by a trustee service to Fannie Mae. Oh, and it might've been owned by another company before then, since 2006.

Cat Nap Inn Primitives said...

We actually lived in a dome here in Poulsbo..only the roof ended where most do..not like this one..it was a great house..seemed large because of the dome..had 2 skylights great kitchen...and no I didn't walk around circles all day long..my friend asked me that....silly girl..we loved that house...have a great week..you always make me smile..:)

Scott said...

To the average person, domes seem like the coolest kind of house you could ever have. Straight out of the future!

In practice, domes are a complete nightmare. Their construction is incompatible with every construction material except concrete and (in theory) foam. To build one you end up making lots and lots and lots of cuts everywhere which allow air and water every opportunity to penetrate into your house. They're difficult to expand and unless your furniture is round, expect to have a ball arranging it against the walls.

The worst domes had a continuous curve of cedar shingles from low pitch to vertical. Oh, how mathematically perfect they looked but unfortunately in the real world cedar shingles don't work in low pitch roofs so the top rotted in a couple of years sending rain leaking straight down those many many cuts.

This dome tried to solve that problem with areas of distinct pitch changes so you can replace individual sections but you still have a house that's mostly roof with rain directly hitting it and pouring down it.

32bites said...

Google streitview has a decent-ish photo of it.

http://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&q=4705+15th+St+E,+Tacoma,+WA+98424&ie=UTF8&split=0&gl=us&ei=3w7TSY_bKIG6tQOF-fT7Cw&ll=47.244733,-122.365562&spn=0.001333,0.002414&t=h&z=19&iwloc=addr&layer=c&cbll=47.24446,-122.365628&panoid=neXobjBPnnWTZG_JBJLdzg&cbp=12,358.68530391369694,,0,3.8592836169723594

Anonymous said...

The varying pitches actually works okay with comp shingles. My parents live in a dome with a comp roof in the Northwest, and they have had good luck so far. The 30-year shingles lasted about 20 years on the flat part of the roof and were still in good shape on the nearly vertical parts. Now that it was redone a few years ago, they expect to get another 20 years out of the roof with few or no leaks. The inside is not as difficult to decorate as you might think, but you do have to take the curve into consideration.