Saturday, November 29, 2008

Don't blame the chair



For once, it's not a chair having a time out.

Naughty stove. Naughty, naughty stove.

(By the way: this listing shows the washer and dryer out on the back porch. I know L.A. has glorious weather -- if you like warm, sunny days and cool, clear nights, pffft -- but really? Washer and dryer outside? Is this a common thing down there? Does it never rain?)

17 comments:

Anaya's Mama said...

I grew up in Southern California and yeah, we had our w/d on our back porch. We even had a roly counter thingy we could put over the top but we never used it.

Jean said...

Sure, it rains, but you have the porch overhang. When I was a wee tot we had our washer and dryer out on the back porch--that was the only place there was room. We lived in Bakersfield at that time.

Jean said...

Sure, it rains, but you have the porch overhang as protection. When I was a wee tot we had our washer and dryer out on the back porch--that was the only place there was room. We lived in Bakersfield at that time.

FoxyMoron said...

Well the kitchen had no room for my dishwasher so I had to have my washing machine out on the back deck so the dishwasher could live in the laundry. But I wasn't living in LA, just in sunny Sydney.

Anonymous said...

I'm in LA with an outside washer/dryer. Really, nothing rusts because it hardly ever rains. It's nice to do laundry out in the great weather.

Love this site!

Glory von Hathor said...

looking at the other photos, I see there's a cushionless sofa/day bed pushed face down in the hall... That's not discipline, that's cruelty.

And is that a whip on the bed?

Timothy Murray said...

I'm an american in Peru and we have our washer outside since it's the only place where we can hook it up, meaning we screw the hose onto the outdoor sink.

LadyCiani said...

I've lived in Southern CA all my life, and I've not experienced the washer/dryer outside in any place I have personally lived, but yes, it's fairly common. Especially in the houses where the square footage is small and there is no attached garage. That pretty much describes the older homes in more run down neighborhoods which have never been kept up properly.

What you're really asking is not about how much rain we get (see previous comments about the overhang protecting the person from wet), but "how COLD does it get?" Because no one wants to do laundry outside when it's cold. The answer is: not very, not often.

sugahippeaux said...

Thanks Glory, I thought the flipped cushion-less daybed was a very large quilt rack. Silly me.

Anonymous said...

I grew up in a small house built in 1959 in Southern California.

We had washer and dryer hook ups on the back patio, too.

But, my parents couldn't afford a washer and dryer for many years, so we walked to the laundromat carrying bags of clothing.
(We only had one car and my Dad drove it to work, so my Mom and I basically walked everywhere. No buses or taxis around back then.)

It was a major event in my life when we finally got a washer and dryer! We were thrilled with it there.

The house cost $13,000.00 when it was bought new in 1959.

emily said...

In Northern California it's not uncommon either, especially in older homes and apartments (my 1920s apartment in Burlingame (near San Francisco) has washer/dryer in the middle of the complex just under an overhang.

LL said...

i live in Tucson and my washer and dryer is outside too, under my porch overhang. My family got a kick out of it when they came to visit.

Leeshka said...

Yup, grew up in the Inland Empire, and the washer/dryer at my grandparent's house is outside

Babs said...

Okay, here's a question for you Californians (and Tusconians): How do you keep random strangers from strolling up to your back porch and doing a load or two?

Heather said...

@ Babs: Pit bulls. Everyone in the Inland Empire has them. Seriously.

Shawna said...

Just when you think you've stumbled on the perfectly lovely home! It looks fantastic from the outside, but then on the inside, you see...

*A daybed, stripped and forced to lie facedown in the front room...
*A whip on the bed in a back bedroom...
*A stove put in the timeout corner away from the other kitchen appliances...
*A box fan made to do manual labor by carrying a load of blankets on its back...
*A bathtub humiliated by having to wear a silly dolphin curtain...
*A washer and dryer kicked out of the house entirely and begging at the back door...

Man. The people who live in this house are seriously disturbed. Do NOT let them adopt a toaster or other small appliances!

LBTudor said...

Sorry to say its also popular in Hawaii. And think you can throw a table cloth on it and use it as a serving table. Multi-purpose!