Saturday, December 6, 2008

Norwegian sink contest!

I'm in the mood for a contest. So here you go: three photos showing sinks. Strange sinks. Norwegian sinks.





Q: What is the purpose of the open-fronted sinks?

Leave your answer in a comment. The author of my favorite answer will receive a copy of either Kyoichi Tsuzuki's Tokyo: A Certain Style or James Lileks's Interior Desecrations: Hideous Homes from the Horrible '70s (winner's choice).






Notes:
  1. Although I am curious about the real use of these sinks, I suspect that my favorite answer will not necessarily be the most truthful one.
  2. If I can't decide which one is best, I'm going to let some random person in my family decide.
  3. You've got... oh... let's say... a week. So only comments made before late afternoon (Pacific time) of Saturday, December 13th count.
  4. I have to hand-approve all comments on this blog because of idiot SEO spammers, so don't worry if your thoughtful entry doesn't show up right away.
  5. If the winner lives somewhere that make it very expensive for me to ship a book to them... um... they might just win the satisfaction of a job well done.
  6. This is being done by me, just me, and not any advertisers or companies or rogue states intent on (cue: patriotic music) taking over our beloved democracy through blogs.
  7. Make sure you leave some way for me to contact you if you win. If you're posting with your Blogger or Google username, that's enough; otherwise you should leave your e-mail address (feel free to munge it).

Whee!

Update: the contest is closed! And the winner -- picked by a random family member, because I couldn't make up my mind -- is... Garrett Albright! Congratulations, Garrett Albright! Come on down!

138 comments:

kprentice said...

A Bidet?

Jagrafess said...

Its for men to wash their private parts in whilst standing up.

Garrett Albright said...

Need to wash the floor? Need to wash the dishes? Don't have time to do both? Have I got the sink for you!

TikiPundit said...

Easier to pee in when you're drunk.

/yeah, it's rude
//all I could think of as I imagined water splashing onto the floor when you try to shove that skillet into that thing to clean it.
///OK, that analogy didn't make sense

Heather Sisman said...

Urinal. Sorry, it's the best I can come up with. I think an open front sink would mean danger in my household, but a urinal would be very practical.

(Love your blog by the way!!)

Stuart said...

These are bidet sinks, made popular by the busy Nørse-on-the-go (literally)who understands the concept of space savings. The only thing missing is a clock. And a washer and dryer.

Christy said...

It is not a sink, but in actuality a urinal. Those Norwegians are really efficient.

Christy

emmy airportwithaview at hotmail dot com said...

Norwegian bidet?

Sue said...

a kitchen alternative to a bidet?

Anaya's Mama said...

It's for the natural effect, you know, waterfall in kitchen. For the lazy folks who don't want to go for a walk to see nature.

kelley.costa said...

I believe the jingle goes something like this (sung to the tune of the hokey pokey: Norwegian sinks, add a touch of class, if you've no bidet, they can clean your stinky...butt!"

Anonymous said...

they're actually deeper than they seem, so they're not truly open-fronted. they're just built in lower. it's convenient, really - you can rinse larger items (pots, pans) without hauling them up to the upper wash basin (where you normally do dishes). Also, you can empty buckets et al.

love,

An actual Norwegian.

Bepp

amy in ct said...

i am thinking "in home" hair salons, looks alot like the sink my hairdresser rinses my hair in here in the states!

me said...

It's the new and most handy baby washing sink alternative. When the baby gets too big to fit in the shallow sink pop them sitting up in the open-front model for years of child-washing convenience. Also useful in later years for caring for those aging parents or if you want to have an up-close and personal dishes washing experience.

CT said...

My turkey was so big... I had the sink open to wash it!

Gayle said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
christy said...

Pregnant bellies. (You ever try hand-washing dishes when you're 9 months pregnant?!) Fortunately my days of that are over. And when that happens, this special sink is for getting your young ones up there to learn to wash the dishes themselves!! (Where to I sign up to get one?!)

Sherry said...

When you want to have a nooner there in the kitchen, but your man has short legs so the counter top is too high....

Gayle said...

House includes a half bath.

Okay, it's a quarter bath.

Okay, if you're a male cook, you can pee while doing dishes.

And for women out there, if your husband is doing the dishes, that's a small price to pay.

(I felt the need to edit a mistake; sorry for the prior deletion.)

Brothergrimm said...

Might be a little obscure, but my first thought was that it looked like Capt. Kirk's captain chair, so I thought this could be used to wash off your Shatners before putting them in the salad?

sean b said...

Actually it comes from an accident. One parent had a very hyper-active kid who used to skate around inside with his socks. He crashed into the sink and broke off part of the front. She was so embarrassed that she cut it out evenly to make it look on purpose and when her friends saw it, they started to copy her because they thought it looked nice. It soon because a tradition for everyone to have a sink like that.

Charlene said...

The real reason is disabled accessibility - people in wheelchairs can use them.

I do like the "Norwegian bidet" idea, though.

stljoie said...

How about food preparation...like cleaning fish.

Dana said...

I think they are sinks for children to wash their hands...or short adults. They have to strip naked before washing so they don't get their clothes wet, which is awkward when guests are in the home. On a busy day they could then skip a daily bath or shower. There is a drain in the floor to catch the water.

Wanderjenn said...

And zen ve vash de floors wit de water going over like zis, yes?

Seth said...

You don't expect the reindeer to climb *all* the way up on the counter, do you? It was hard enough getting that dirty thing into the kitchen...

kateohkatie said...

You've got a baby who just dropped a *really* messy one---a 15-wipe job. Rather than try to clean him in the real sink or in the bathtub, simply sit him up in the Baby Butt Washer! Much more economical than going through all those wipes.

Acappella Princess said...

Water conservation. You're only allowed to wash your dishes in 1/4 sink full of water..OR ELSE!!!

Joi said...

It's made that way because Norwegians like to suffer. "If it doesn't hurt, you're not doing it right," that's their motto. (And yes, my family IS Norwegian)

This sink is OBVIOUSLY meant to be used as a regular sink, but the user must press their body up against it to keep it from leaking. Best if the running water is close to boiling temperature. Pain and failure keep you humble, after all.

Jane Lane said...

Darn! I was going to say it was a Norwegian version of the Bidet! Apparently thats what it is though! Hmm.. Let's go with a Baby bath! Ok, that was lame. Oh well, I am done! Still love your blog though!

rob said...

I think Norwegians are so fond of the fjords that they've sought to simulate the cascade effect within their own homes. Between that and the sleek pine furniture, we feel quite close to nature, thank you very much.
- An Ostby, displaced in the US...

Holbeck Row said...

obviously, it's a water saving device,
half a sink = half the amount of water used.

John and Stephanie's blog said...

It's for when the water freezes in the sink, and have no hot water, so you just slide the chunk of ice out of it and grate it and pour strawberry syrup on it and enjoy a nice summer treat.

Or when cousin Bjorg comes home after hours of skiing and his hair is all frozen.

Sharah said...

Ice skating is big in Norway. Some people like to practice in their own homes. These kitchens also have special floor-freezing functions so once you have flooded the room using the specially designed sink you just press the instant freeze button and ta-DAH! Your very own ice skating rink. Genius.

Glory von Hathor said...

Norway has some problems as you know. Some of these they are willing to talk about (such as the difficulty getting good whale meat), but others have to be kept secret in order not to destroy the tourist trade and not to traumatise children.

Now, I'm not here to judge other people's cultural practices, but there is a serious problem with those trolls causing mayhem, and the population has to be managed somehow.

You know those trolls - you may have seen the little wooden carved trolls that they sell to tourists. Well, they have real trolls in Norway.

Well, when a troll comes to your kitchen to steal food, the best thing to do is to grab him by the hair, and get him into the sink. Then you must get out your scrubbing brush and scrub him and scrub him until he is gone and only a small pebble is left.

It can be a dangerous business restraining a troll - he will do his best to ruin your nice bundar by getting his dirty handprints on you.

The easy access troll scrubbing sink became mandatory by law in the 1960s, but was phased out in the 80s as the tourists asked too many awkward questions.

Stuart said...

It's Official - these are bidets. Even if that was never the intended purpose, it is now.

Sara, you need to call Nørway and inform them of this fact. It's your duty as an American™. Godspeed.

Dessie said...

In traditional European style, it's actually a multi-purpose unit.

The main purpose is of course for washing babies. For centuries now Europeans have shunned traditional bathing for babies, opting instead to wash baby in the sink - the lack of water presents less risk of drowning. However, what if you need to go to the door and accept a delivery from Ikea? That's where this sink comes into its own - baby couldn't possibly manage to get into trouble as there's not enough water, and in fact baby has an exit (you cannot see the optional slide attachment as it will be kept in a cupboard).

The second design point is unique to Norway and Finland, where the fjords are numerous: the sink acts as a first line of defense were the fjord to overflow and invade the house. By lowering the profile of the sink the extra fjord-water will flow into the cavity before hitting the work surface and damaging electrical items. You will notice that no Norweigan hose has plug sockets below the line of the kitchen counter, anywhere in the house.

Jill Elizabeth said...

It's an effort to reduce the wasting of water, just like the low-flow toilet. You know, save the planet and everything. You can't use too much water without it spilling all over the floor. That'll teach you to kill the earth!

Dan said...

In Norvay, ve geev you savety in our zinks! If you drop your industrial hair dryer (powered by und wireless extension cord) in de zink, it weel drop right out! Everybody happy!

(Oh, and that would TOTALLY make toy boat expeditions cooler.)

GracefulFire Girl said...

Well, my immediate thought was "kitchen potty", but really how sanitary is THAT?? Not.

Then perhaps a "child sink" so they could stand by you and play while you worked and not be unfoot all the time (I personally hate flattened children on the kitchen floor!)

Then perhaps it is really just a drain so that you don't have to lift a bucket of water to the counter and make a big mess when it splashes everwhere, there by making more work when you have to clean up. Perhaps sinks like this are what Norwegians such a happy culture. Who knows?

Meg said...

Okay, so I spent a summer abroad in Norway when I was in college. Once I learned what the reason was for the open front sink, I couldn't get over how clever it was!

Here's what it's for:

For about 9 months out of the year, Norway is very snowy and cold, especially up north. People don't venture out that much, and they usually make their own fun at home. The folks with the open front sinks are typically the wealthier families, because, you see, they have also taken the steps to completely waterproof their kitchens, the cabinets, doors, windows, the whole 9 yards. They have the ability to close off the kitchen, fill it with water and use it as a swimming pool. The open front sink allows you to fill your kitchen/pool about four times faster than a regular sink.

Or something like that.

David said...

I think the one in the kitchen is for the dwarfs and midgets to easily wash their hands whereas the one in the bath makes for a nice seat for butt washing.

Brooke said...

I was going to post a suggestion, but Joi's response made me laugh out loud (I know plenty of Norwegians and it's dead-on). So instead of posting my own, I'll put in a vote for hers.

Windrose said...

Gold medalist Greta Jansen is back for another try at the Olympic Sink 4 Gallons. Can she clean an entire holiday dinner place settings for eight and the pots and pans? She approaches the sink, confidence in her eyes. The hot water flows out, exactly 4 gallons, a drop of soap, and she picks up the scrubber. She nods to the officials, and the timer starts. She has the glassware, the flatware, oh, remarkable move there! She stacked all the plates in the sink, and didn't overflow! Now the dessert plates, and the gravy boat. Wow, look at the water in that sink! How clean can she get the venison roaster with that mucky water? Wait, she is pulling something from her apron pocket! Oh, the judges don't like that! She has added a purifier to the water, and there goes all the grease and food particles. There may be a penalty for that one. The potato pot is clean, the roaster, and the pie pan, now the veggie casserole. And she has pulled the plug! Ladies and gentlemen, I think that will be a new world's record for Ms. Jansen! Even with a penalty she should still get pretty high scores. While we wait for the judges, let's look at that stunning move again, with the purifier. She reaches in to her apron pocket, and puts three drops in the sink! Very fluid movements there. Now, back to the judges. Yes, a 10, another 10, a 9.5, and a 7, oh, that might hurt her more than the penalty! Those Easter European judges are so hard to please.

And that wraps up the 4 Gallon. Now we go to the Jumping-Into-Snowbanks-From-The-Hot-Tub Men's finals. Alan?

(my dot windrose at sbcglobal dot net)

Jonathan|sfs said...

These homes are owned (or will be owned) by people who cannot afford to effect the remodel that they want to. They have installed open-fronted sinks in hopes that the Wet Bandits (from Home Alone) will visit them and leave their calling card, thus enabling them to remodel on someone else's dime.

Cat Nap Inn Primitives said...

in case you get tired washing dishes you can sit down and take a rest or to wash your bumb...a sit down tub...LoL...

Sarah said...

There is no real functional use of the "Norwegian Sink" even though, technically, it can be used.

Designed by the husband and wife team of Arvid and Ingvill Rygh in the mid 1960's these sinks were the signature pieces of their "Bruksnummer" school of design which played with form and function.

The Rygh's were known for post-modern spin on everyday or household items (faucets, electrical sockets, furniture and small appliances in addition to these sinks). The idea was to incorporate thought-provoking installation pieces mixed in which truly functional pieces, hence the side by side sinks in these examples.

While little known outside Norway, the Rygh's work was popular there for about 15 years and is now seeing a revival. These particular sinks are whimsical and odd and can be used (hilarity often ensues) but are, at best, works which challenge our ideas about function and beauty, use and usefulness.

At least that is what I teach my students in "Contemporary Norwegian Kitchen Design 102."

TBG said...

It's pretty simple... it's the easiest way to get your shirt wet while washing dishes. It's usually too much trouble to make sure the splashes get all over you, so an open-front sink ensures success.

megskathy said...

It's an extra shelf for storing pizza boxes, takeout cartons, microwave dinner containers, etc. (Not all of us need to wash dishes!)

Artful Dodger said...

Sitzbath!

Lynn Sinclair said...

You can't see it, but there's glass at the front of the sink -- far easier to see just how many pots are left to wash (always too many when my husband cooks!).

Zee said...

Have you ever wanted to wash the car or mop the floor only to find that the bucket of water you wanted to fill won't fit into the sink? In this handy tool, water flows up a ramp (not seen in picture) and water can then be used to fill a bucket resting on the floor without having to lift the container up. It's great for people with bad backs.

Julie said...

I'm quite curious about "an actual Norwegian" (Bepp's) comment:

"you can rinse larger items (pots, pans) without hauling them up to the upper wash basin"

Up from WHERE, exactly? I mean, is it a secret Norwegian tradition to eat on the floor?



Okay, with four males in my house, my first thought was - like so many others - a urinal. You know how as soon as you start to wash dishes, you get your hands in that warm soapy water, and... you need to pee.

Problem solved!

Those Scandinavians are SO efficient :0)

Len said...

It is obvious to me. The Norwegians are tired of always being the tall, beautiful/handsome healthy blonds.

This is to encourage Norwegians to look more the typical, overweight American. As the stomach expands it fits right into the cut out and makes the sink complete.

And yes, I resemble that American remark.

Anonymous said...

Though I have to agree, Joi has the correct answer (I am a bit Norwegian, too)...
but another remote possibility, perhaps is so that you can soak your pots and pans- handle sticking out front, so they sit more level and the whole soiled surface of the pan can soak.
If I want this effect in the U.S., my pans must sit on my counter and soak, which isn't good for my counter, if the pans are wet.

Jen said...

Clearly, in-home, do-it-yourself baptisms are all the rage in Norway.

Anonymous said...

ah, somebody stole the pregnant dishes answer! ;)

Erica Russ said...

On first glance, one might think these are pictures of kitchens, but I think they are really nail salons. Just sit yourself in the stainless steel tub and dunk your hand in the adjacent basin. So easy and sanitary!

Brittaney said...

Okay, so you know the Mad Tea Party scene in Alice in Wonderland, where the Mad Hatter asks for half a cup of tea and they slice the teacup in half?

That was my first thought. I guess these owners only wanted to pay half-price for the sinks.

Brittaney said...

By the way, my e-mail is random-joy@hotmail.com

Kim said...

I have two answers.

One, that is where produce is stashed, prior to or during washing/prep work.

Two, it is where a dish drying rack fits in.

Janet Selman said...

OK, I'd buy the disabled access thing, if it weren't for two things: first, at least two of them don't have the kind of recessed kick plates under the cabinets for wheelchair access, and second, the faucet handles are still out of reach.

Freelance Writer said...

It's simple. I live with a Swede. Her and her entire family do not like taking showers or baths but twice per month. After consulting with several more Norwegians and Swedes it is so obvious why.

You see, in their homeland, in a great attempt for efficiency, they do not actually have bathrooms. No it isn't a bidet or toilet; it is the Norway equivalent of a shower and bathtub. It is easier to place your head into while sitting on a chair, in order to wash your hair. It makes the whole bathing experience so much better.

If we were to look closer we would see that one of those other kitchen cabinets opens up and has a toilet inside. There is likely a hidden folding door tucked away into two adjacent walls for privacy too.

caroline said...

I think these are for washing hair. as in hair washing stations?

Why S? said...

The sink is where they rinse and then filet their whale tail steaks. You would never be able to fit a whole whale tail in an American style sink. Japanese sinks probably look like this too.

SC said...

Titty washer for midgets?

I defend said...

Imagine yourself in this situation: You are filling a big, deep flower vase with water from the tap in your ordinary sink. To lift it out you have to tilt it under the crane, and half of the water runs out, into the sink. This problem actually really annoys me.

Imagine the sinks seen here employed in the same situation: You fill the vase, you pull it straight out, you keep all the water in your vase, and your flowers survive the whole week!

mariospants said...

Like many things we see on "It's Lovely! I'll take it!" it's an optical illusion. There's obviously nothing wrong with these sinks.

Janet said...

Bring the outdoors in with your own kitchen water feature!

patri said...

The pictures are actually taken of kitchen ceilings. You know, those gosh darn flying Norwegians!! The water falls to the drain on the floor not seen in photo.

patti dot hadad at gmail dot com

Drekab said...

It is clearly for washing your feet. Do you know how hard it is to get you feet all the way up and over the counter? Much easier with this style.

mammamolina said...

I think it's for ease in soaking your hiney after you singed it making one to many copies on the Xerox at work.

Honestly, that sink would have made dishes a whole lot eaiser when I was 9 months pg!

Anonymous said...

This kitchen was purchased and moved into place by a Sweedish fan of the original Willy Wonka movie. The Sweeds, notorious fans of the movie, wanted to replicate the "half-room" in one of the final scenes of the movie (in which Mr. Wonka retreats to his office with the half-clock, half desk, etc.) This was the set for his kitchen which was unfortunately cut from the movie, in more ways than one.

Anonymous said...

I think cats designed these sinks. Oh, sure, they *claimed* it was for easier washing of large pots and so forth. But really it was to make a quick escape possible when someone attempts to bathe them.

Anonymous said...

It's magic. Or future advanced technology. (Same difference, as Clarke said.) There is an invisible force field at the front of the sink which allows hands and pot handles and other solid objects to pass through freely, but does not allow water to pass. Thus you can wash things at an easier angle without getting water all over the floor.

eireann said...

ooooooh i always wanted a sink like they have at the hairdresser, so my servants can wash my hair for me as i lean back and contemplate... nm.

Kellie said...

My friend Steve needs this sink so that he stops peeing on my coffee table while drunk.

zebuladesign said...

I imagine it is so that you can fill a large stockpot easily. But for fun, it could be paying homage to Olafur Eliasson's Waterfalls, NYC. This could be - "Your very own kitchen waterfall."

I love your blog! Also, if picked, I like the "interior desecrations" book.

apronk said...

It's for toddy training.

This is the phase during which a young Norwegian child is trained in the art/sport of drinking. And when the Norwegians drink, boy do they drink.

The sinks are designed with a low open front so that a toddy training child can conveniently access a receptacle for vomit without the assistance of an adult - similar to the way Pampers Pull-Ups make toilet training easier on kids.

Most Nordic parents find that instead of dealing with the embarrassment of taking little Rolf, who is 7 years old, to a Christmas dinner only to find out that Rolf can't hold his alcohol like their friends' 5 year-old daughter, Inger.

You see, neglecting to teach one's children how to force their bodies into a state of alcohol tolerance is Nordic social suicide, really.

katievthemom(a.t)yahoo(d.o.t)com

Anonymous said...

I think not only is it a fashion statement, but it forces one not to leave dirty dishes in the sink and appear like a pig to visitors.

T said...

I'm loving these sinks - for all the times when the kids come to me with Peanut Butter faces (insert face, spray them down) or when Hubby spills Spaghetti Sauce on his jeans (you don't need the explanation there I hope) or when I am doing my home hair coloring... my neck certainly wouldn't hurt as badly...

Besides, it would help bring back the era of the apron... who didn't look sexy in those?

Amanda said...

Indoor waterfall. It's a "design element".

Panthera said...

As a Norwegian, that has one of those sinks, I can truthfully say that it has both it's perks and it's down sides.
When you want to fill big buckets or saucepans it's much easier to get it under the tap and out again, but actually washing things in it is somewhat unpractical.

The problem is that we tend to fill the dish-water wash with dishes, so we then have to wash in the "throw-water sink" (somewhat direct translation of what we call the sink), which usually results in us also washing the front of our trouser.

In secondary school here we go through two years of "home knowledge". This is mainly cooking, but also other home knowledge, like how to do the dishes.

So every 12 year old in Norway know that the "right" way to wash dishes is to fill the flat sink with water and soap, put the cutlery in, and do one and one dish in the soap water, before rinsing it with cold water in the "throw-out sink".

We also were taught how to wash floors, and when you're a small of growth kid, you really learn to appreciate a low sink, that also has a special made edge to rest the bucket on when you empty it.

Stephen Price said...

I think that's how they clean the bell of those huge "Ricola" type mountain horns. Doesn't everybody have one of those in the lands of fjords?

Prigruss said...

It is a (sad) early attempt at the 'Indoor/Outdoor' flow that is so key to many modern homes.
Many thought that bringing the wood in from the forests in to the home would bring them closer to nature. But alas! No. Something was missing. A water feature. There were several attempts to install this unique design feature in the living room, but it was found that the water made the carpet soggy and it eventually rotted.
As the kitchen was the next up-and-coming center of the family home, it was decided that the water feature should be combined with the standard kitchen sink to combine functionality and style in a room that is already relatively waterproof thus ensuring the house's shag pile carpet does not meet a wet and untimely end.
This unique conversation point once would've had the neighbors going green with envy!

lol, in reality it is probably a practical solution for filling buckets and pots and other stuff like that.

Paul Riddell said...

Well, you know, putting a urinal in the bathroom is just tacky.

The Mef Thing said...

I think those were made so you could hold this contest and show how many people actually visit and love your blog.

Can you see I'm impressed by the number of answers?!! Great to know such a great blog is enjoyed by so many people, from all over the world.

You guys had me LMAO BTW with your anwsers!

John said...

you've heard of a dribble glass, right? it's clearly a dribble sink. those crazy norwegians!

Mama T said...

I'm thinking it's a feeble attempt to stop the dog from drinking out of the toilet. but really, for it to work, said dog would need a little step-on bar by his/her feet to activate the water.

Gayton said...

I spent a couple of months in Sweden and Norway, and in nearly every place I stayed, the shower was not separated in any way from the toilet and sink. Whenever you took a shower, the toilet, the sink, and God help you, your towel and whatever you wore into the bathroom, would be soaked, and you'd have to slosh through an inch or two of water to get to the door.

That seemed very odd to me until I saw these Norwegian sinks. Now it's clear. Scandinavians clearly enjoy having a couple inches of standing water on all of their floors. (No doubt they have spigots behind their sofas to have the same effect in the living room.)

The only reason I can conceive for this practice is that Scandinavians place a premium on sparkling clean feet, and feet being what they are, the only way to assure that feet remain pristine at all times is to maintain a footbath on all surfaces in the household at all times.

Wife to 1, Mom to 5 said...

So your really tall dog can drink straight from the faucet instead of the toilet... right?! Of course, he'd have to learn how to turn the water on!

JACLYN said...

That sink makes me nervous. I hate when water pours over and down the counters. Hmmm, my first though was to clean a behind so I'll stick with that. :)
firstrosegrrl@yahoo.com

L L L said...

One you've euthanized your pet or infant, these sinks eliminate someone having to strain his or her back taking the dead body out of the sink. It'll just slide into a garbage bag with minimal effort.

L L L said...

These sinks make it possible for children under two years of age to learn a trade like dishwashing so parents don't have to push their children into joining a circus to earn their keep.

L L L said...

These sinks allow less limber people to wash their feet in the sink.

L L L said...

These sinks are for people who want the experience and convenience of a port-a-potty without the pesky cold weather.

Suka said...

Easy to work from home and multitask...

"So where ya from honey? Well don't worry, we'll have ya looking like a Norweigian in no time. Your color's coming up real nice. Hold this pan a second? As soon as I'm done with the silverware we'll rinse ya before you turn brassy."

L L L said...

The sinks are for children who are eager to learn in-home waterboarding procedures for those considering a career with the CIA or in Guantanamo Bay. Sinks come with complete detailed instructions on how to conduct your own "enhanced interrogations techniques."*

* Sorry. Not available in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, or countries with active nuclear programs.

wilkette said...

Contrary to popular belief, these sinks are not intended to be used as urinals. Rather, in a Scientologic effort to encourage people to refrain from taking anti-depressants, these sinks were designed to appear as though they are smiling to the poor sot slumped at the kitchen table on a Monday morning. Who wouldn't start the day off on the right foot with a happy sink?

ky2here said...

It's a quicker way to chop up the bodies and dispose of evidence before the police arrive.

Cottagecheap said...

Well, since Norweigen elkhounds aer tall dogs they have to drink SOMEWHERE! Yes?

My actual first thought had to do with doing dishes for drunks. You can do dishes even when you can only crawl tot he sink!

Maine VRC said...

Cat bathing, though I like the pregnancy and fat American ideas too. I have to admit, my first inclination was bidet though.

Richard said...

Love to wash dishes but your huge, obese stomach getting in the way? Try the new "Flurgungenstuufen!" Easily keep that water sealed in by lifting up your gut. Don't forget to get our new "Buttenpluugen" to plug up the leak in your "front butt."

Melanie said...

When the ever-present random chair feels dirty, it can creep into the kitchen to take a shower. They have a tough time getting into tubs you know.

Katherine Mary III said...

It's for several different kinds of drunks.

Drunks who always miscalculate the height of the sink and smash the stems off wine glasses.

Frat drunks can use it when taking beer bongs, lean in and swig, no more PBR all over the kitchen floor.

For the drunks that put their empty cans in the sink, just scoop them right into the recycling bin the next day.

Or for the extra sloppy drunk guest that just can't get to the bathroom, problem solved, slide him right up to the sink and as an added bonus you can hose down their head after wards, no more puke smeared across guests faces.

AND you can set up an ice luge in there for your short friends to take shots off of. No watery-boozey floor, happy home owners/party throwers and happy drunk short guests.

Basically this sink fixes a lot of the typical "college years" party snafus.

Kelly said...

Weiner Washer!

Kelly said...

Weiner Washer!

Burn Suburbia said...

Please read the below with a ridiculously overdone German accent or it won't be worthwhile. It may still not be worthwhile. And yes I know the sinks are Norwegian and not German. Don't ask, I'm winging this!

So anyway...

"I sink these sinks are for sitting in and sinking! Ya, they're sinking sinks!"

(told you it might not be worthwhile)

Glenda said...

It's a sink to double as a hair wash station like in beauty salons.

Karen said...

So pregnant women can still do dishes.

Via Ferrata said...

They obviously bought their sinks from Ikea and the uber-confusing assembly directions led to the creation of the half-sink. The other half is used to shield one's hair from strong winds.

Leisha Camden said...

Someone already said this (maybe more than one someone, I didn't read all the comments) but basically it isn't open-fronted. You just think it is, but ... you're wrong. It's much deeper than the other one. It's for washing bigger items like pots and pans, and for rinsing things. My kitchen is set up like this, it's very convenient.

And that top one is exactly the kitchen cabinets my grandmother had. Childhood memories ...

Leisha Camden said...

Oh, and to whoever wrote all that about trolls: actually, it isn't at all difficult to find good whale meat here in Norway. Just go to any decent grocery store.

Andrea said...

It's clearly so you never have to use a bucket in your kitchen ever again. Just fill up the sink and then you can dip your mop in it no problem!

JenSolo said...

Clearly the open-fronted sinks exist in order to inspire this contest!

kookyknut said...

We all know a woman's place is in the kitchen. This sink enables her husband to supervise her doing her job properly, uninterrupted by toilet breaks while he drinks his beer. Quite often the fridge is located next to the sink for easy access.

MoLiSi said...

DA!! kprentice stole mine!!!

MoLiSi said...

ok...a bidet AND crud de te area. wash n eat!

Tiggerriffic said...

Allows pans with handles to be flat in the sink while washing.

Slee Burgess said...

The classic Farmhouse sink, with its frontal expanse of porcelain or copper, has become popular in kitchen remodels and new homes. This modern kitchen reflects the disgust Norweigians feel toward those broad-fronted plumbing vessels. It's the Anti-Farmhouse Sink.

mverno said...

everyone thinks the same thing .duh

juedy said...

So you don't "throw the baby out with the bathwater."

whomajigi said...

It's probably to avoid the splash from doing dishes.

However, my real answer is that it is perfect for the tremendously titted woman who wants to wash dishes but can't find a place to put them in the meantime.

travellingmomof2 said...

Those norwegian sinks are fantastic. I know from experiance. A night of drinking aquavit with the local fisherman really can do you in. The only thing that can resolve a morning hangover is some Lutefiske. But, those trolls don't want you to wake up clear minded. They like to trip you up and when you fall, you don't have the edge (literal edge and sink edge) that will HURT ya.

Rachel said...

It's for my kids to make a big mess playing and swimming in the sink.

toughturtles said...

youwont bang those big pots under the faucet anymore easy access

7odd60 said...

Its an awkward bidet of course

my1218 said...

Here it is people:
I'm going to say it's a "no excuse kids are doing the dishes sink".

So now little kids can't use the excuse "I cannot reach!" or "It's to tall!"

:) hahaha Anything to make chores easier for them - I'm in!

Kat said...

Swirlies

chromiumman said...

less surface area to clean

Mrs. B said...

LOL TBG!

djolsen said...

This is for the bigger items. It sloops downward. You can wash your carrots or pots or peel your corn and it is especially good if you are in a wheel chair. You can defrost your freezer much easier. You can put drinks and ice in it for a party. i don't allow anyone to pee in my kitchen, I don't care if they are drunk or sober. Even if I had a hole in the floor 10 feet deep somebody would spill water on the floor, so that is not an issue.

The Mind of Michel said...

so my son has no excuse of being too short to do the dishes

Sara said...

argh -- I hit the wrong button this morning and accidentally deleted a bunch of posts.

Kate wrote:
I'm not looking not looking at the other comments or on google.
I have a feeling in reality it is part of the cooking ritual; perhaps dual cutting board/sink stuff?
I'd like to think that they wash their hair in their kitchen sink XD
(strycker@slu.edu)


wwe11 wrote:
I think it is for handicap people to be able to work in the sink when they need to. Thanks for the chance to win.
erma.hurtt@sbcglobal.net



Anonymous wrote:
Probably to put very large pots in to run water into for cooking or to clean it.
Alternately in very hot summers like we have here (where the heat and humidity are a lethal combination) sitting in it naked and having cold water flowing over your back and year could be very refreshing.
ladycat713@yahoo.com

Patricia said...

What? You've never wanted to create your very own waterfall in the comfort of your own kitchen? Water features are a HUGE selling point!

Prlinehan(at)hotmail(dot)com

linav8 said...

To wash your lovely mermaid locks

Melinda said...

I searched the net for the answer to what this may be. I haven't got a clue,except that it looks similar to a Bidet.But that would be awful to have in your kitchen as your pictures show??
When the contest is won--I hope u will post the answer. I am very curious.
melinda.s41@gmail.com

vmkids said...

I think that sink is for those little helpers in the kitchen that get wetter than the dishes they are helping with!