Sunday, August 24, 2008

Come dancing


Oh my, this one that Katie found is poignant. They used to have dances here: "This Was At One Time A Grand Old Place Now It Is Just A Lumber And Beams And Old Wood On 2 Lot In A Haunted Town."

8 comments:

Linnee said...

You can trip the light fantastic. Literally trip.

Samurai Mom said...

That one is sad...

Anonymous said...

You know, I actually like these poignant ones the best. Here's a gym - probably where the weddings were, the dances, the auctions, the town meetings. Then the railroad went quiet. now the town is empty - it's 50 miles from Minot, fer chrissake, and probably eerily quiet. 2007 property taxes? $3.42. They're letting two parcels and an abandoned 30x70 structure go for $3300 on Craigslist... which is probably about what it cost a hundred years ago. There are cars in front of the typical listings on this blog worth more than that.

Dunno. Just gave me pause. Quite possibly the most thought-provoking real estate listings I've ever seen.

Emily said...

anonymous, thanks for your post. It put this even more into perspective; I was sad looking at the photo, but your insights really have me thinking. My mom always used to say, "Oh, if these walls could talk..." when we were in an old building. I wonder what stories these old walls would have.

Glory von Hathor said...

Oh my god. It's like the Rivoli Ballroom, but unloved.

It should've looked like this...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/will_brooker/207921596/

Theresa said...

I would love to have seen it in its glory. With that high arched ceiling, an old country band on the stage and folks dancing about. Thank you anonymous and Emily for your comments. I have to agree, it's a sad and thought-provoking post.

T

Roberta said...

I think I saw this on Craigslist and its an old school gymnasium that the owner thought someone might want to reclaim the wood. It wasn't being marketed as a family home.

Anonymous said...

Not to pile on here, but, yes, what a downer. I lived in a very small town on the plains of eastern Colorado for several years, and this reminds me of things you'd see in dying little towns in east CO/west Kansas. Little towns with what used to be some great architecture, that probably used to be great places to live. It's too bad people no longer want to live in such small towns--or if they do, there's not any way to make a good living.