Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Included: smelling salts


I don't understand what I'm looking at. I just don't. Even though it's just a tiny photo Danny found, it's somehow setting off my vertigo. I see the figure in the corner, then my eye wanders up to the ceiling fan, then whoomp next thing I know I've passed out on the floor.

20 comments:

mudslicker said...

WHAT?!?!?!

OMJC....is that Dracula's coffin they've got taking up the ENTIRE kitchen (I'm calling it the kitchen because of the telltale coffee pot on the spacious stool countertop).

Talk about vertigo...it appears to be tilted like some all-wooden pinball/skee ball machine. However, I find the drinking glass with the three carnations is a nice touch; as well as the oversized carved napkin ring.

Did Martha Stewart supervise the staging for this place?

I won't even comment [hardly] on the cirque Stonehenge/Easter Island era decorating scheme throughout the rest of the house.

I believe the spirit of "the goddess" stays with this house? Blessed be, people and can ya go easy on the patchouli?

Galadriel said...

I once lived at a place I called "The House of Seven Gradients." Trying to line up the corners would make anybody dizzy...

PrincessLuceval said...

"Dear, I need some curtains for the windows."

"Great! I'll just go make some in my woodshop!"

Anonymous said...

I don't have vertigo at all so there's nothing visually odd about the place for me, at least nothing having to do with decor. I live in Colorado though, and judging from the area, the decor is probably Ute influenced.

I only vaguely know the area, and I'll be honest, don't know much about the Ute so I could be wrong, but the area is right for that.

Iron "GeekGirl" Misty said...

Good God. How do you fit 3 bedrooms in 1191 square feet?

I love that the lot feature includes that it is "cleared".

Alissa said...

PrincessLuceval, thanks for the curtain comment. That made me laugh out loud. I was trying to figure out what I was looking at.

whynotsmile said...

My train of thought on seeing this photo:

What do you mean what's that? It's a fireplace, right? A slightly odd fireplace... maybe an oddly-positioned alcove... oh, you mean the... window? ... mirror? Yeah, that's a bit weird, but I've seen worse, what's the pro.. GAH!

Sandra D said...

That's not a window, it's a guillotine!

T said...

sacrificial altar?

Glory von Hathor said...

Geez Vendor, what did rectangles ever do to you in a past life?

Elana said...

The window looks like a guillotine to me.

Cellar Door said...

It must be the altitude making you dizzy.

bikerchick said...

You have entered the wormhole. Please proceed through the Looking Glass. (Dear Realtor: Please pass the Excedrin and don't you dare do this again if you want to work in this town!)

Stuart said...

Seems to me as if they design aspect was inspired by a cigar cutter. At least that's what I'm telling myself.

And Anonymous - The Ute design could be correct, although I see some hints of modern outdoorsman in there. Guess that could be construed as "Sport-Ute".


Sorry.

Anonymous said...

Actually, this one is making me nauseous too. I don't know why.

Meli said...

The design on that moldy looking shield kinda looks like the symbol from Heroes... I guess the moldy looking guy behind it had a special ability.

It must have been a pretty cool one for The Company to preserve him and prop him up in the corner like that.

Anonymous said...

I love this design scheme. I believe it's called "Le Attatch wooden sh*t to everything". I think it was a french post-Romanticism design style

Scott said...

This appears to have been influenced by the "Craftsman" movement that was popularized by by Gustav Stickley's magazine when it was built. Stickley emphasized simple hand-built wooden details instead of the "phony" machine-made ornamental details of the competing late-Victorian style houses since it's "more honest". If you pick up one of his books you see some of the most dated and depressing houses of the 20th century with dark wood everywhere and none of the elaborate details people associate with houses of that vintage. One example: instead of having smooth plaster curves between the walls and the ceilings, it was common to do what they did here: nail a big ugly piece of stained knotty pine at the top of the wall.

The first thing I would do to that place is rewire it to get rid of the conduits running all over the walls and the ceilings.

Anonymous said...

That window doubles as an awesome security system. Anyone with intention to steal/harm in that house is going to loose a body part when they try to get through the window.

Anonymous said...

c'mon, please tell me that it was a Blair Witch joke!